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1971: baseball nirvana

I wish I could put myself in a time machine and go back to the summer of 1971.

Sure, I would not be blogging if it were August 1971. Sure, I would not be playing Buzztime trivia if it were August 1971. The American economy wasn’t in great shape in August 1971, and Nixon made a foolish mistake by taking the United States off the gold standard.

There were good things about 1971, though. The Brady Bunch was on the air. Gas was 30 cents per gallon; even with inflation, that’s $1.90, 45 cents less than what I paid last night when I filled up in Salina.

Major League Baseball was certainly better in 1971.

Hank Aaron hit a career high 47 home runs as he drew closer and closer to Babe Ruth’s record of 714, once thought to be unbreakable. In his final season with the Giants, Willie Mays led San Francisco to the National League West championship in yet another epic battle with the Dodgers. San Francisco lost the National League Championship Series to the Pirates in four games in their last postseason appearance until 1987. The Orioles won their third consecutive American League pennant by sweeping the Athletics in the American League Championship Series. It was the Athletics’ first trip to the postseason since 1931, when they were in Philadelphia and led by legendary Connie Mack.

The 1971 All-Star Game in Detroit was one of the most memorable. Aaron and Johnny Bench staked the National League to an early 3-0 lead with home runs, but Reggie Jackson began the American League comeback by launching a monstrous home run off of a transformer on roof above right center. The pitcher who served it up was Dock Ellis, the same Dock Ellis who threw a no-hitter while allegedly under the influence of LSD (his claim) the previous season.

Ellis, the volatile right-hander from Pittsburgh, was the Naitonal League’s starter. The American League countered with Oakland lefty Vida Blue, who went on to win the AL Cy Young and Most Valuable Player. More importantly, it was the first time there were two black starting pitchers in an All-Star Game.

One of the umpires in the 1971 All-Star Game was Jake O’Donnell, who from 1968-71 officiated both in the American League and NBA. O’Donnell resigned from the AL at the end of 1971 to concentrate on basketball. It was a wise move, for Jake worked the NBA Finals every year from 1972 through 1994. O’Donnell is the only man to officiate All-Star games in two major sports.

Also on the umpiring crew that evening in Detroit were future Hall of Famer Doug Harvey, and Don Denkinger, whose moment of infamy in Kansas City was still a long way off.

Nearly every team still wore flannel uniforms in 1971. Sure, they were hot, but they were beautiful for the most part.

The Athletics had a lovely sleeveless vest which came in white, gray and gold, and those could be worn with gold or green undershirts. The Dodgers debuted a new road top with thin blue and white piping along the shoulders. The Padres had a tan road uniform. The White Sox and Phillies both debuted new uniforms, and both would keep them when they switched to polyester the next season. I thought both sets were downgrades; the White Sox’ royal blue and white set of 1969-70 was downright gorgeous, and the Phillies ditched the classic set they debuted in 1950, when the “Whiz Kids” won the franchise’s only pennant between 1915 and 1980.

Three teams wore polyester that season. The Pirates debuted them in July 1970 when they moved from Forbes Field to Three Rivers Stadium; the Cardinals began 1971 wearing them; and the Orioles gradually switched from flannel to polyester throughout that season, finally ditching flannel for good in the ALCS. Ironically, the 1971 World Series was all polyester, as the Pirates took down the heavily favored Orioles in seven games.

In 1971, the Senators were still in Washington. The Brewers were in the American League West, building healthy rivalries with the Twins and White Sox.

That changed in 1972.

Cheapskate Senators owner Bob Short lied to the American League, claiming he was going broke in the nation’s capital, giving owners a supposed reason to allow the second incarnation of the Senators (the first became the Twins in 1961) to move to Dallas/Fort Worth and become the Texas Rangers. RFK Stadium was not a great facility by any means, but Short traded it for Arlington Stadium, a minor league facility which had no business hosting Major League Baseball. Yet it was the home of the Rangers through 1993.

Dallas/Fort Worth is too big an area for any major sports league to ignore. However, Short was, well, (extremely) short-sighted for deserting the nation’s capital for a dump like Arlington Stadium. Had DFW waited until the American League expanded for 1977, it would have had a stadium which might still be standing, or would have served a team much better than Arlington.

I visited Arlington Stadium a handful of times in my teenage years. I hated the park. Hated it. Those metal bleachers in the outfield were hot enough to fry eggs. Of course, the idiots who expanded the park built bleachers instead of building more decks from foul line to foul line, which would have been better for fans watching the game and the team, since those tickets would have commanded a higher price than bleachers.

The Senators’ shift to DFW prompted AL owners to move the Brewers to the American League East, pissing off the White Sox and Twins, each of whom who lost six games per year against Milwaukee. The Great Lakes trio would not be reunited until 1994 when the American League Central, but that lasted only four seasons, because the Brewers gleefully moved to the National League for 1998.

Speaking of the leagues, another great thing about baseball in 1971: NO DESIGNATED HITTER.

The designated hitter is a pox on baseball. Charlie Finley, you can rot in hell. It is the single worst rule in all of sports. There are many other terrible ones, like the shootout in the NHL and high school football overtime, but the I despise the designated hitter more than any other rule in sports.

Basketball players are not allowed to play only one end of the floor–at least if they want to stay on the court. Wilt Chamberlain and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar scored loads of points during their playing days, but if they didn’t rebound and block shots, they would never have sniffed the Hall of Fame.

Other than the goaltender, hockey players must be good offensively and defensively if they hope to stick in the NHL. Gordie Howe, the NHL’s greatest goal scorer until Wayne Gretzky came along, prided himself as much for his defense as his offense. No opposing winger dared cross Mr. Hockey, or else he would find himself in a world of hurt.

Association football? Same as hockey. Defenders don’t score many goals and forwards don’t play beyond the center line, but a player who is a defensive liability will be on the bench unless he scores goals as frequently as Cristiano Ronaldo or Lionel Messi.

Players went both ways in the early days of the NFL, and in college until 1964. Many players at small high schools go both ways, and even at some large ones, because coaches would rather have an excellent athlete who may be fatigued rather than a mediocre one who is fresh.

When Mr. Doubleday invented baseball in the 19th century, he intended for the nine players on the field to specialize in a defensive skill AND be able to swing the bat. Some swing the bat better than others. That’s professional sports.

Major League Baseball is the best of the best of the best. The 750 men who populate the 30 MLB rosters are supposed to be the best in the world. Not all of them have to hit .350 with 50 home runs. Heck, Bill Mazeroski and Ozzie Smith, among many others, were mediocre hitters, but so great with their glove they have plaques in Cooperstown.

I can tolerate–not accept–the DH in Little League and high school. However, at those levels, pitchers are often the best hitters, too, so it’s not necessary in those cases. Little League has a much larger problem than the DH. You’ve probably read my rants about this in earlier posts.

In college baseball, the DH should be abolished, especially in Division I. If a young man is good enough to be pitching at the highest level of college baseball, he should be able to stand in the batter’s box up to four times every week if he’s a starting pitcher.

The National League is going to adopt the designated hitter soon. I am deathly afraid of it. When it happens, I will be back on this blog using language not safe for work. You’ve been warned.

When you went to the ballpark in 1971, there were no silly promotional handouts, no dizzy bat races, no scantily clad 20-something women shooting t-shirts out of air-propelled mini-cannons, and no mascots. Umpires still wore their blazers many days. American League umpires wore the balloon chest protector, leading to the Junior Circuit becoming known as a high-strike lead, contrasting to the National League, where the low strike ruled. Games usually lasted two hours, give or take a few minutes. There a few real doubleheaders, where one ticket got you two games, although there were fewer by 1971 than there had been in 1961, and fewer in 1961 than in 1951.

In my opinion, the best thing about baseball in 1971–and the 34 years prior to that–NO FACIAL HAIR!!!!

In 1971, only the Reds had a rule banning facial hair, but the other franchises unofficially followed suit. Many players had mutton chops and other forms of long sideburns which were in vogue in the late 1960s and early 1970s, but not one player in professional baseball sported a mustache and/or beard.

Unfortunately, this came to an end in 1972. The culprit? Charles O. Finley. I hope you are seriously rotting in hell, Mr. Finley. You were a bastard in so many ways.

Cheapskate Charlie, who refused to pay his A’s (from 1972-86, the Oakland franchise was officially known as the A’s) a living wage, somehow came up with an idea to give each player a $300 bonus if he grew a mustache by Father’s Day. Sure enough, every goddamn A’s player grew one.

The A’s, wearing their new polyester uniforms of “kelly green”, “Fort Knox gold” and “wedding gown white”, ended up in the World Series against the clean-shaven Reds in a series termed by the medias as the “hairs” vs. the “squares”. Oakland won in seven games.

I’m glad I wasn’t alive in 1972. I would not have known who to root for. I despise the Reds for Pete Rose, a gambling pedophile who played dirty. I disliked the A’s for the facial hair, not to mention the strong hate I have for Finley, who pulled the Athletics out of Kansas City after the 1967 season because of his avarice.

The plague known as the DH came into being in 1973. That’s one of two reasons why 1973 was a horrid year for the grand old game. The second was the introduction of one George Michael Steinbrenner, who bought the Yankees from CBS for a paltry $10 million. That season was also the last for the original Yankee Stadium and the first for the facility now known as Kauffman Stadium.

In 2019, finding a clean-shaven MLB player is as hard as finding a four-leaf clover. I don’t get it.

Beards in hockey are ubiquitous in the playoffs. I don’t like them. Wayne Gretzky never grew a playoff beard. He was okay, wasn’t he? At least most hockey players shave them. Baseball players aren’t shaving them, and it’s gross.

I’m surprised there isn’t a huge Detroit Lions fan club in western Kansas because of coach Matt Patricia’s disgusting facial hair. People out here could root for the Lions without feeling guilty, since Detroit plays the Broncos and Chiefs only once every four years. The Lions happen to play both this season, and for some reason, Kansas City has to go back to Ford Field. Under the current schedule rotation, Detroit will go 20 years without visiting Arrowhead. Good work, NFL.

1971 also happened to be a wonderful year in other sports.

  • The Milwaukee Bucks won the NBA championship in their third season, sweeping the Baltimore Bullets in four games. Of course, having Lew Alcindor, who had already changed his name to Kareem Abdul-Jabbar but not yet adopted it on the court, and Oscar Robertson didn’t hurt.
  • The NFL in 1971 was fabulous. Vikings defensive tackle Alan Page was the league’s Most Valuable Player. Dallas legend Bob Lilly and the Doomsday Defense powered the Cowboys to their first Super Bowl championship. The Dolphins, who lost Super Bowl VI, won the NFL’s longest game, defeating the Chiefs after seven minutes, 40 seconds of a second overtime period in what was the final NFL game in Kansas City Municipal Stadium.
  • College football came down to Big Eight superpowers Nebraska and Oklahoma on Thanksgiving Day in Norman. The Cornhuskers survived 35-31, then steamrolled undefeated Alabama 38-6 in the Orange Bowl to finish the first 13-0 season. That Crimson Tide team switched to the Wishbone offense and also fielded its first black players, John Mitchell and Wilbur Jackson.
  • After the previous three Stanley Cup finals series ended in four-game sweeps (sorry Blues), the Canadiens and Black Hawks played a series for the ages. The home team won each of the first six games, with the series returning to Chicago for game seven. In what turned out to be the final game for Montreal legend Jean Beliveau, Montreal silenced Chicago Stadium by winning 3-2 for the first of its six Stanley Cups in the 1970s.
  • UCLA won its fifth consecutive college basketball championship, overcoming determined Villanova 68-62 in the final at the Astrodome. Kansas reached the Final Four for the first time since 1957.
  • There were 48 NASCAR Grand National races in 1971, many on short tracks. The next year, the schedule was shortened to 31 races, and Winston cigarettes (🤬🤬🤬🤬🤬🤢🤢🤢🤢🤢🤢🤮🤮🤮🤮🤮🤮🤮🤮) became the sponsor of the top series.

Also in 1971, cigarette advertising on TV and radio was banned following the completion of the Orange Bowl (Nebraska 17, LSU 12) on New Year’s Night.

Too bad H.G. Wells’ vision will never come to light. I’m stuck in this era of beards, tattoos and other things I can’t stand.

I’m not going to apologize for this novella of a post. I needed to say these things.

Maybe Buzztime knew I was blogging about 1971 in baseball. The first question of sports trivia tonight: What award did Ferguson Jenkins win that year? Of course any baseball fan worth his salt knows it was the National League Cy Young.

Baseball+KC=crazy love

Tonight is the calm before the storm in Kansas City. In 24 hours, the Royals will take the field in Baltimore for their first American League Championship Series game since October 16, 1985, when the Royals somehow erased a 3-1 series deficit to the Toronto Blue Jays by winning 6-2 at Exhibition Stadium.

It’s all over the media–TV, radio, newspapers. Kansas City can’t get enough of the Royals. I figured if the Royals ever got good again it would be like this, because for all of the talk about the Chiefs, Kansas City is first and foremost a baseball-mad town. The city was home to one of the most successful Negro League teams for nearly 50 years and saw many a legend pass through, and sadly, many of those legends never saw action in a single Major League Baseball game due to segregation.

One of the Negro League legends who got to the Majors, Satchel Paige, made his last appearance in Kansas City. He pitched three scoreless innings for the Athletics on September 25, 1965 vs. the Red Sox, probably the highlight of the Athletics’ 13 seasons in KC. The Athletics were in tatters when they moved from Philadelphia in 1955, and then went into the toilet when Charles O. Finley bought the club in 1961.

To put it mildly, Finley was an asshole. BIG ASSHOLE. He tried to dick around with the dimensions at Municipal Stadium, and in 1964, he ordered the right field fence to be angled to a point where it stuck out exactly 296 feet from home plate, the same distance it was from the plate to right field at Yankee Stadium. The American League told him to immediately cease and desist. He then moved the fence back to the bare minimum of 325 feet, and the he tried putting a roof hanging 29 feet over the field so it would be effectively 296 feet. Nope. Even with the right field fence at 325 in 1964, Municipal Stadium allowed the most home runs of any park in American League history up until that time. The next year, FInley went 180 degrees in the opposite direction and erected a 40-foot fence in right field. Not surprisingly, Municipal Stadium allowed fewer home runs than any park in the Majors in 1965 and 1966.

Finley was even worse with his Mule, Charlie O. Charlie O. was treated far better than his players and staff, and he was known to poop all over the field, and he his lackeys were expected to pick up the poop.

Kansas City was beyond angry to see the Athletics leave in 1967. So angry, in fact, U.S. Senator Stuart Symington threatened to revoke baseball’s antitrust exemption if Kansas City was not given an expansion team by 1971. Kansas City was not on the list of expansion candidates for 1969, but commissioner Spike Eckert and owners, fearing the loss of the antitrust exemption, buckled to Symington’s threat and awarded KC a replacement AL team for ’69.

Luckily for KC, the man who stepped up to own the Royals was 180 degrees from Finley. Ewing Kauffman grew up Kansas City, loved baseball, and had deep pockets to spend the money to attract talent to the Royals. He also was forward thinking in player development, beginning the Royals Academy in 1970. The Academy is long gone, but its legacy will never be forgotten, for it produced dozens of men who one day wore the Royals uniform, most famously Frank White, one of the best defensive second basemen to play the game. White is one of only two Royals players to have his number retired; you can guess the other.

In July 1975, the Royals hired Whitey Herzog as their new manager. Herzog previously managed the Texas Rangers in 1973 before he was fired by another terrible owner, Bob Short, who moved the second incarnation of the Washington Senators to an oversized minor league ballpark halfway between Dallas and Fort Worth in 1972. Arlington Stadium was never suited for Major League Baseball; the only reason Short left DC for north Texas was the only reason any owner moves his or her team: MONEY.

Herzog’s authority in Arlington was undercut by Short, never more so when Herzog was forced to start 18-year old left-handed pitcher David Clyde only three weeks after he was drafted out of Houston’s Westchester High School. Clyde was 18-0 with an 0.18 ERA during his senior season, but no man, no matter how much he dominates in high school, is ready for Major League Baseball without at least getting some seasoning in the minors. Now college players might be ready right away, but high school, no way. Short was desperate to draw people to his crappy park–the Rangers were averaging less than 8,000 fans per game–and so he brought Clyde up immediately. The Rangers had their first sellout when Clyde pitched against the Twins on June 27, 1973, and although Clyde was wild, he won, and Short continued to

When Billy Martin was fired by the Tigers in September 1973, Short put Herzog out of his misery by firing him and hiring Martin. Even though Texas was just 47-91 under Herzog, the White Rat had the Rangers playing much better fundamental baseball, and the team did not get shutout through the first 80 games of that season after being shut out 26 times in 1972, when Texas’ manager was the greatest hitter who ever lived, Ted Williams.

Herzog preferred an aggressive style of baseball, one which emphasized speed. Hit-and-run wasn’t just a novel ploy; it was a means to score runs. And Royals Stadium was perfect for Herzog’s style, with the old, hard artificial turf and power alleys 385 feet from home plate.

Indeed, Herzog had the Royals in the playoffs in his first full season of 1976, winning the first of three consecutive AL West titles in 1976.At that time, only the Mets had experienced more success that soon, winning the 1969 World Series in their eighth season. However, the Mets were  The Royals very nearly got to the World Series on their first postseason try, but Chris Chambliss broke the Royals’ hearts by hitting a home run off Mark Littel on the first pitch of the bottom of the ninth in the fifth and deciding game to give the Bronx Bombers a 7-6 victory. The Yankees would again win the ALCS in five in 1977, but this time, New York won games four and five in Kansas City. There were rumors the Royals’ slugging first baseman, John Mayberry, partied all night after the Royals won game three and was too hung over to play game four. In 1978, George Brett hit three home runs in game three at Yankee Stadium, but this time, the Yankees needed only four games to close the ALCS.

After the Royals’ pitching went south in 1979, Herzog was fired and replaced by Jim Frey.Herzog wouldn’t have to wait long to find another job, hired in June 1980 by the other Major League Baseball team in Missouri, the St. Louis Cardinals. He was also the Cardinals’ general manager at first, but relinquished those duties in 1982. As GM, Herzog quickly rebuilt the Cardinals, trading for Bruce Sutter and Ozzie Smith, both of whom are now enshrined in Cooperstown.

KC returned with a vengeance in 1980. Brett was flirting with a .400 batting average deep into August before finishing at .390. Willie Wilson came of age as the Royals’ leadoff man, and Amos Otis enjoyed a renaissance in center field, complimenting a strong pitching staff led by Dennis Leonard, Larry Gura and new closer Dan Quisenberry. The Royals easily won the AL West, then swept the Yankees, who won 103 games under future Royals manager Dick Howser, in the ALCS. Brett’s three-run home run in the eighth inning of game three into the right field upper deck at Yankee Stadium off of Goose Gossage put an excl

Getting to the World Series and winning it are two distinctly different quests. The Royals found that out the hard way against Philadelphia. The Phillies, led by Pete Rose and one of the greatest left-handed pitchers of all-time, Steve Carlton, won the first two games in the City of Brotherly Love. Brett was hampered in game two by a bad case of hemorrhoids, which he had surgically removed when the team returned to Kansas City. Brett was healthy for game three, and KC won that game, and game four as well to even the series.

Philadelphia won game five 3-2, and then took it back home, where the Phillies won game six and the series.

The Royals slipped below .500 in 1983, with the season’s highlight being the Pine Tar Incident at Yankee Stadium. Yankee manager Billy Martin tried to get a ninth inning home run by Brett disqualified because he had too much pine tar on his bat. At first, the umpires called Brett out because the pine tar was higher on the bat than the legal 18-inch limit. Instead, Brett was out and the Yankees won 4-3. Two days later, AL president Lee MacPhail reversed the umpires, upholding the Royals’ protest and ordering the game to resume three weeks later, with Brett’s home run on the board. Brett did not take part in the game following his home run, since he was ejected for attacking the umpires, as was Howser, by now managing the Royals. When the game resumed, it took all of NINE minutes for the Royals to close the game out.

In 1984, the Royals won a weak AL West by holding off the Angels and Twins. They were no match for Detroit in the ALCS, as the Tigers, who started the year 35-5 and won 108 games by time it ended, swept the series three straight. The Tigers would pummel the Padres, Kansas City’s 1969 expansion brethern who did not make the playoffs until that season, in the World Series.

Then came 1985. The Royals and Angels engaged in an exciting season-long race for the AL West title, with KC finally overcoming the Halos late. Nobody gave the Royals much of a chance against the playoff newcomer Blue Jays in the ALCS, and Toronto proved the experts right by winning three of four games.

In past years, the Blue Jays would have been on to the World Series. Not in 1985.

Starting that season, the league championship series were epxanded by commissioner Peter Ueberroth from best-of-five to best-of-seven, largely to increase contributions to the players’ pension fund, which received a cut of the gate from every postseason game.

The Royals took full advantage of the expanded LCS, winning game five in Kansas City behind a Charlie Liebrandt shutout, then going back to Toronto and stunning the Canadians by winning games six and seven at frosty Exhibition Stadium. Hours before the Royals won game seven in Ontario, the Cardinals finished off the Dodgers in six in the NLCS.

The Show-Me Series was here. It was pure euphoria for Missouri sports fans at a time they needed it most. The Chiefs were in the midst of a long, dark period which saw them make one playoff appearance between 1972 and 1989; the football Cardinals relapsed into irrelevance after coming within a missed field goal of winning the NFC East division in 1984 (they would be in Arizona by 1988); the University of Missouri was mired near the bottom of the Big Eight Conference on the gridiron, saved from the cellar only by the pitifulness of Kansas State and Kansas; the Blues would get to the NHL playoffs and flame out year after year; and the state lost the NBA the previous March when the Kings packed up and left Kansas City for Sacramento.

Most expected the Cardinals to win the series. They were there only three years earlier, where St. Louis defeated the Brewers in seven games, and they played in a much tougher division, where they needed every one of their 101 victories to win the NL East by just three games over the Mets. The Cardinals had NL MVP Willie McGee, who led the league with a .353 batting average, and two 20-game winners in John Tudor and Joaquin Andjuar, although the latter won only once in Septebmer and not at all in October. The Cardinals had a good slugger in first baseman Jack Clark, but not much power otherwise. St. Louis was short-handed, however, as rookie left fielder Vince Coleman, who led the league in stolen bases, was out after he broke a bone in his leg when he was run over by the tarpaulin at Busch Stadium prior to game four of the NLCS.

Kansas City had a strong starting pitching rotation (sound familiar), with left-handers Charlie Leibrandt, Danny Jackson and Bud Black complimenting ace right-hander Bret Saberhagen. George Brett was still a feared hitter, and Willie Wilson gave the Royals the better leadoff man in the Series.

St. Louis won the first two games at Kansas City, but both were close, 3-1 and 4-2. When the series shifted east on I-70, the Royals turned to Saberhagen, and he handcuffed the Redbirds 6-1, although many in St. Louis felt AL umpire Jim McKean squeezed Cardinal pitchers while giving Saberhagen a generous strike zone, a claim which was not totally refuted by Herzog.  St. Louis appeared to bounce back by winning game four 3-0 behind Tudor, but the Cardinals were crushed in game five 6-1, sending the series west.

Then came the infamous game six. St. Louis took a 1-0 lead into the bottom of the ninth, and it appeared they were two outs away from the title when Jorge Orta hit a soft groudn ball to Clark. Clark’s throw to closer Todd Worrell was in plenty of time, but first base umpire Don Denkinger–American League–called Orta safe. The Cardinals then fell apart, as catcher Darrell Porter, an ex-Royal and the MVP of the 1982 Series with the Cardinals, committed a passed ball, and Clark dropped a catchable foul pop-up. Kansas City took full advantage, with former Cardinal Dane Iorg lacing a two-run single to right field to score the tying and winning runs to force the seventh game.

Game seven was a disaster for the Cardinals. Tudor was ineffective, and after he was taken out in the third, he went into the clubhouse and badly cut his left hand on an electric fan. The Royals took the lead early on a Darryl Motley two-run home run in the second , and kept pouring it on, rubbing salt in the Cardinals’ wounds by scoring six runs in the fifth. In that inning, Herzog was ejected for screaming at Denkinger, telling him “We wouldn’t be here if you hadn’t missed the (freaking) call last night!” One pitch later, Andjuar was ejected and had to be restrained from going after Denkinger. Final: Royals 11, Cardinals 0. Kansas City’s finest sporting moment since Super Bowl IV.

Sadly, it all went south right away. Howser was diagnosed with brain cancer in June 1986, and he would die one year later. Brett and Saberhagen would stick around and continue to be productive, but the Royals soon faced the new economic realities of baseball, and by 1994, when the strike hit, they had been relegated to also-ran status. KC fell below .500 in 1995, finished last in its division for the first time in ’96, and by 2002, the Royals would begin a five-year stretch in which they lost 100 or more games four times.

It wasn’t until 2013 that the Royals fully rebounded, going 86-76 thanks to a strong second half. Now, they stand just four wins away from their first World Series since I was 9 years old. If the Royals can make the World Series, Kansas City will go bonkers. If the Royals WIN the World Series, look out.