Not a Cubs fan

Some of the most insufferable fans in American professional sports will not shut up.

Chicago Cubs fans, whom I have found to be arrogant, overbearing, and sometimes delusional during my 30-plus years of following Major League Baseball, are now rubbing it in.

All because their team won ONE GAME.

The Cubs won the National League wild card game last night in Pittsburgh, 4-0. The Pirates have got to feel cursed. Three consecutive years in the playoffs, three consecutive appearances in the wild card game. The first one went well, defeating the Reds before losing to the Cardinals in five games in a National League Division Series.

The last two years, the Pirates have not scored in the wild card game. They were shut out by the Giants’ Madison Bumgarner last year, and this year, they fell victim to the Cubs’ Jake Arrieta, who is being touted by fans on the north side of Chicago as the second coming of Ferguson Jenkins, the Hall of Fame pitcher who spent the best years of his career with the Cubs in the 1960s and 1970s.

I have long since had it with people calling the Cubs “lovable losers”. To me, they are not lovable. We get the Cubs slammed down our throats, nearly as much as the Yankees and Red Sox. At least the Yankees and Red Sox have won the World Series recently.

The Cubs? Have not won the World Series since 1908. That’s right, 1908. Teddy Roosevelt was president. JFK, Nixon, Ford, Carter and Reagan had not been born yet. Neither had George H.W. Bush. World War I was still more than five years away. Arizona and New Mexico were not states.

The Cubs haven’t been to the World Series, period, since 1945. They have been to the playoffs a few times since I began watching baseball.

The first time in my lifetime was 1984. The Cubs were on TV nearly every day on WGN, the Chicago superstation. It was great to have Major League Baseball on nearly every day during the summer doldrums, but WGN’s attitude that the Cubs were the team you should love and everyone else in the National League was evil got nauseating. Harry Caray may have been a great showman, but as an announcer,it was way too much.

When the Cubs blew a 2-0 lead in the NLCS (1984 was the last year the league championship series were a best-of-5) and lost to the San Diego Padres, I wasn’t crying. The Cubs got their just desserts for their arrogance. After winning Game 2 at Wrigley Field, all the talking heads on WGN could discuss was how the Cubs matched up with the Detroit Tigers, who were on their way to sweeping the Royals in the ALCS. A few days later, Cubs fans were crying, and the Padres were playing the Tigers.

I’ve seen and heard way too much about Steve Bartman, the fan who was wrongly blamed for costing the Cubs a trip to the 2003 World Series. If the Cubs were such a great team in 2003, they don’t give up eight runs in the eighth inning of Game 6 of the NLCS to the Marlins. And if even if they lose Game 6, there’s no reason the Cubs couldn’t win Game 7.

Bartman did NOTHING WRONG. He went for a foul ball in the stands, just like any fan would. Moises Alou, the Cubs’ left fielder who bitched and moaned about Bartman committing fan interference, probably could not have caught the ball. He let the incident affect him the rest of the series, and when the Cubs lost the series, I couldn’t shed a tear, even though I am not a Marlins fan, either.

This year, Cubs fans are once again pushing themselves as the greatest team in baseball. They are now crowing they will crush the archrival Cardinals in the division series, the Mets or Dodgers in the NLCS, and then whatever poor sap team wins the American League in the World Series. I’m sure Chicago Mayor Rahm Emmanuel has already planned the parade route.

Cubs fans are taking on the same arrogant tone as Bulls fans did when Michael Jordan played. Then again, Bears fans did the same thing during their dominant 1985 season.

Enough is enough. Cubs fans are talking the talk before walking the walk.

About David

I am a sportswriter for a group of weekly newspapers in small towns across northern Kansas. I grew up in New Orleans, went to college at LSU and wandered in the wilderness until Hurricane Katrina finally put me on the path to my current job.

Posted on October 8, 2015, in Major League Baseball and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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